Thursday, November 27, 2014

Massachusetts Aristocracy Arms for War

Radical Republican Governor John Andrew of Massachusetts loudly encouraged war against the South in 1861, yet he worked hard purchasing the patriotism of non-Massachusetts men who would serve in his regiments. Faced with the necessity of raising 4,000 men by Lincoln’s draft and expecting a riot in Boston, he held troops in readiness and asked Secretary Stanton to institute courts martial against his enraged citizens. At Andrew’s request, Lincoln allowed him to enlist captured Africans in South Carolina for his State quota of regiments – thus keeping white Bay State men at home.
Bernhard Thuersam,

Massachusetts Aristocracy Arms for War

“Even as conservatives were exploring the possibilities of conciliation and seeking means of influencing [president-elect] Lincoln, Massachusetts’ newly elected Governor, John Andrew, was kindling the fires of radicalism. Southern society, he declared, must be entirely reorganized, and the federal government ought to be driven to aid in the work.

There must be no “weak-kneed” measures. “I am for unflinching firmness in adhering to . . . all our principles.” “We must conquer the South,” he said, and “to do this we must bring the Northern mind to a comprehension of this necessity.” “War is in the air,” he later confessed, “and some of us breathed it.”

As Congress gave more attention to compromise measures, Andrew hurried to Washington to consult with congressional radicals. A Virginia congressman, John Y. Mason, swore to Andrew that never could the South be induced to rejoin a Union of which Massachusetts was a member.

Thus confirmed in his direst apprehensions, Andrew held conference, on Christmas Eve, with Senators Doolittle of Wisconsin, Trumbull of Illinois, and Sumner and Wilson of his own Massachusetts. Solemnly the radical coterie decoded that the integrity of the Union must be preserved, “though it cost a million lives.”

The Governor-elect’s impassioned and sanguinary pronouncements chilled conservative hearts in Massachusetts. Boston Brahmins were horrified and indignant; they distrusted Andrew, whom they believed to be wanting in good judgment, common sense and practical ability.

“What was apprehension about Andrew,” ruefully admitted Sam Bowles, “is now conviction.” He wobbles like an old cart – is conceited, dogmatic, and lacks breadth and tact for government.” Democrats, sickened by the radicals’ willingness to sacrifice other men’s lives, asked whether people wished to die for the radical cause.

[On his inauguration day January 1, 1861, the new governor stated that] South Carolina’s secession was an injury to the Old Bay State, which was ready to endure once more, if need be, the sacrifices it had borne during the Revolution. So saying, the newly-sworn Governor called on the legislature to arm the State for war.

The entire address, sneered the Boston Post, was a lamentable appeal to passion, combining “the narrowness of a mere lawyer, with the intenseness of a fanatic.” It was “sophomoric in style, immature in thought, wretched in argument, and small in political knowledge.”

To assist him in his work, Andrew chose four aides – carefully culled from Harvard graduates and the better families – bestowed military titles upon them, and put them to gathering steamboats, purchasing supplies and inspecting the militia. The people, [Andrew] said, must become used to the smell of gunpowder.”

(Lincoln and the War Governors, William B. Hesseltine, Alfred A. Knopf, 1948, pp. 110-112)

Ferguson Protesters Call to Boycott Businesses on Black Friday ‘Unless They Are Black-Owned’

Hunters Feed The Hungry This Holiday Season


Every year hunters from around the country feed the hungry by donating nearly three million pounds of meat and 11 million meals to those who are less fortunate. Just one pound of ground venison can feed four people.

More @ Townhall

America's Self-Evident Course in Foreign Policy


President John Adams in his Fourth of July, 1821 address reiterated the foundation-stone of American foreign policy with: “America does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all.  She is the champion only of her own.  She well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, were they even the banners of foreign independence, she would involve herself beyond the power of extrication . . . [and in doing so] She might become the dictatress of the world.  She would be no longer the ruler of her own spirit.”
Bernhard Thuersam,

America’s Self-Evident Course in Foreign Policy

“[President George Washington said]: Put not your trust in allies, especially those who are stronger than you. At worst they will betray or disappoint you; at best they will make you the pawn in their games. Trust instead in the Lord and yourselves in your dealings with aliens, and cast not away the protection conferred by a generous Providence.

The second great tradition of US foreign policy is habitually dubbed “isolationism.” This, despite dogged efforts by some diplomatic historians to instruct us that no such principle ever informed American government, and that the word came into general use only in the 1930s. What brought “isolation” to the consciousness of the American public was the propaganda of navalists like Captain A.T. Mahan, who sought to pin on their anti-imperialist critics a tag that implied they were old-fashioned curmudgeons.

Thus the Washington Post proclaimed at the time of the Spanish-American War that “the policy of isolation is dead,” and the Oxford English Dictionary first made reference to the concept in 1901: “Hence, Isolationist, one who favors or advocates isolation. In US politics, one who thinks the Republic ought to pursue a policy of political isolation.”

The Encyclopaedia Britannica never made “isolation” a rubric, and only after World War II did its articles on diplomacy refer to the phenomenon.  Most telling of all, not even the “isolationists” of the 1930s had any use for the term, preferring to call themselves neutralists or nationalists.  So, our vaunted tradition of “isolationism” is no tradition at all, but a dirty word that interventionists, especially since Pearl Harbor, hurl at anyone who questions their policies.

Let us dispense with the term altogether and substitute for it a word that really describes the second great tradition in American foreign relations: Unilateralism.  It was a natural, even inevitable corollary of the first American tradition, for if the essence of Exceptionalism was liberty at home, the essence of Unilateralism was to be at liberty to make foreign policy independent of the “toils of European ambition.”

Unilateralism never meant that the United States should, or for that matter could, sequester itself or pursue an ostrich-like policy toward all foreign countries.  It simply meant, as Hamilton and Jefferson both underscored, that the self-evident course for the United States was to avoid permanent, entangling alliances and to remain neutral in Europe’s wars except when our Liberty – the first hallowed tradition – was at risk.”

(Promised Land, Crusader State, Walter A. McDougall, Houghton-Mifflin, 1997, pp. 39-40)

981 Missouri Black Babies Aborted Since Michael Brown's Death, No Riots


To illustrate the utter hypocrisy and injustice regarding the black community following the death of Michael Brown, LifeNews published the depressing reality that 981 black babies have been aborted in Missouri since that fateful day back in August-and not a single person has rioted over their wrongful deaths.

LifeNews published the numbers in response to a blog post from a pro-life advocate in Missouri named Reverend Katherine. She wrote:

More @ Truth Revolt

New Secretive Special Operations Detachment Opens Up in North Carolina

Via avordvet


America now has another group of special operations commandos that will support a number of secretive military operations.

During a no-frills ceremony in October, the North Carolina National Guard introduced a new detachment of highly-trained “quiet professionals” to support joint military operations around the globe. State and Federal officials oversaw the activation of the unit that will “provide planning and mission support” to secretive special operations forces.

Lt Col Matthew Devivio, Public Affairs deputy director for the North Carolina National Guard, told TheBlaze the unit is currently dubbed “SOD-X.”

More @ The Blaze

Rhode Island: Shuttered cathedral may become slave trade museum as Episcopal Church seeks to unbury past

Via Billy

A plan to open what would be the nation's only museum centered on the trans-Atlantic slave trade would focus on the Episcopal Church's role in its history and the sometimes-buried legacy of slavery in northern states like Rhode Island.

The museum at the shuttered Cathedral of St. John, a church where slaves once worshipped, would explore how the church benefited from the trade and helped bring it to an end, said Bishop Nicholas Knisely of the Diocese of Rhode Island.

More @ Fox

Bakery Vandalized in Ferguson Gets Nearly $200K in Donations


The owner of a bakery in Ferguson, Missouri, said she is in awe of the support she received after rioters on Monday smashed the windows and damaged some kitchen equipment in her small shop.

Natalie DuBose, a 32-year-old mother of two, owns Natalie's Cake's & More at 100 S. Florissant Rd., which opened in early June. DuBose told NBC News Wednesday that baking and cake decorating have always been a passion, but they didn't become a full-time job until earlier this year, when she finally saved enough to open her store.

More @ NBC News

Top Occupy organizer trained Ferguson protesters

Via Billy

 Lisa Fithian

In a development that may portend extended disruptions, veteran street organizer Lisa Fithian, previously dubbed “Professor Occupy,” recently trained Ferguson protesters how to “simulate chaos.”

Fithian is a legendary organizer who once announced she seeks to “create crisis, because crisis is that edge where change is possible.”

She was one of the luminaries of the Occupy Wall Street movement and was a lead organizer in the infamous 1999 Seattle riots against the World Trade Organization that descended into violence.

The 1999 WTO event in Seattle devolved into widespread rioting in which more than 40,000 protesters, some using violent tactics, descended on the city, prompting police to use tear gas and rubber bullets. The clash became known as “The Battle of Seattle.”

More @ WND

2-Minute Thanksgiving NFL Ad Warns of Rogue President

Thanksgiving Proclamation, November 15th 1861

WHEREAS, it hath pleased Almighty God, the Sovereign Disposer of events, to protect and defend us hitherto in our conflicts with our enemies as to be unto them a shield.

And whereas, with grateful thanks we recognize His hand and acknowledge that not unto us, but unto Him, belongeth the victory, and in humble dependence upon His almighty strength, and trusting in the justness of our purpose, we appeal to Him that He may set at naught the efforts of our enemies, and humble them to confusion and shame.

Now therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, in view of impending conflict, do hereby set apart Friday, the 15th day of November, as a day of national humiliation and prayer, and do hereby invite the reverend clergy and the people of these Confederate States to repair on that day to their homes and usual places of public worship, and to implore blessing of Almighty God upon our people, that he may give us victory over our enemies, preserve our homes and altars from pollution, and secure to us the restoration of peace and prosperity.

Given under hand and seal of the Confederate States at Richmond, this the 31st day of October, year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty one.

By the President, JEFFERSON DAVIS

Three Men With Rifles Showed Up at the Ferguson Protest in Dallas — and It Wasn’t in Solidarity With Mike Brown

Via Joe

Members of an open-carry group marched alongside demonstrators protesting the Ferguson grand jury decision Wednesday night in Dallas, Texas.

Three individuals belonging to a group called “Come and Take It” trailed protesters, saying they were there to step in and protect private property if things spiraled out of control.

“If, per chance, private property starts to be damaged this evening, we’ll put ourselves in between the crowd and private property,” member Matthew Short told WFAA-TV.

More @ The Blaze

Men allegedly plotted to bomb Gateway Arch, kill Ferguson officials, report says

Via Billy

Two St. Louis men reportedly planned to blow up the city’s iconic Gateway Arch and kill two prominent figures in the Michael Brown shooting case in Ferguson, which has sparked protests nationwide.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Wednesday that Brandon Orlando Baldwin and Olajuwon Ali Davis were indicted last week on federal weapons charges but authorities expect more charges to be filed against the duo relating to the alleged plot.

More @ Fox

‘Wow, Is This an Anti-Racist Rally or a Pro-Segregation One?’: Read the Controversial Rules for White People at a Canadian Michael Brown Vigil

Via Joe

Image via Facebook

Are you a white person who wants to protest the situation in Ferguson?

If you were in Ottawa, Canada, on Tuesday night, you would have been asked to clam up and take a backseat position to give black participants center stage, as the National Post reported.

A Tuesday night candlelight vigil for Michael Brown, the black 18-year-old who was fatally shot back in August by a white police officer, came under some fire after the following instructions were posted on the event’s Facebook page:

More @ The Blaze