Thursday, March 1, 2018

13th NC PATCON May 30th - June 4th

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Picture above via Cousin John

Event will follow schedule of  PATCON's  before and will be updated as events/speakers/classes/sponsors/raffle items are added. (See below) 




12th NC PATCON October 4th - October 9th 2017



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PLEASE SUBSCRIBE TO THIS POST, SO YOU WILL BE KEPT UP TO DATE!   

Southern Manners Are Expected From all.  As my mother would say, if you can't say anything nice about someone, don't say anything at all.  Thank you. :)


 Under 7, free


  7-12, $14


  13 and up, $25


Includes world famous East Carolina *Pig Pickin' on Saturday!   
 

*Chopped pork, Southern fried chicken, black eyed peas, string beans, baked beans, rolls, tea, water and banana pudding.

If you are planning to attend the June PATCON,  please remit your fees ASAP, but NLT 9 May  Please send check to address below.  I do not deposit checks until the week before and I would appreciate all remit funds now.  Thank you.


Brock Townsend
94 Roberson School Road
Tarboro, NC 27886


The funds will be used for seating, tables, porta potties, Eastern North Carolina Barbecue with all the trimmings, equipment and tent. We would like to encourage company sponsors to donate money for this event. Any company donating $50 or more will be listed as a sponsor on the website and at the PATCON.

 

Free camping Wednesday - Sunday.


  No animals, please, as my Peacocks are more than sufficient to annoy all but me.:)

The PATCON will be held at
*94 Roberson School Rd


Tarboro, NC 27886 

*Use the front entrance for those camping. As you cross the second set of cattle guards, camp to the right in the area with fruit trees alongside the fence and a fire pit in the middle.  For those not camping,  come in the side entrance by the graveyard and parking will be in the area of the two tobacco barns.

Poll: Nearly 60 Percent of Americans Say Imposing Tariffs on Chinese Steel, Aluminum Is Crucial

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 Breitbart

Nearly 60 percent of American voters say imposing tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum is crucial to the United States’ economic relationship with China.

In a Morning Consult poll, 59 percent of Americans say it is “important” that President Trump place tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, specifically from China, showing a wide range of support for the White House’s economic nationalist agenda.

About 66 percent of voters said shrinking America’s more than $375 billion trade deficit with China was key, as well as 56 percent who said they wanted to see the Trump administration challenge China’s leaders on intellectual property protection, and 44 percent who said they want China labeled as a currency manipulator.

Trump’s cracking down on China when it comes to trade is supported by 67 percent of Republicans, though trade globalists inside the White House — such as Gary Cohn and Steve Mnuchin — have attempted, but failed, to prevent the populist president from taking a tough stance on China.

On, Trump announced that he would eventually be putting a 25 percent tariff on imported steel and a ten percent tariff on imported aluminum, a move that is backed by the majority of Americans, according to the Morning Consult poll.

Multinational free trade agreements have been responsible for massive manufacturing outsourcing and job loss over the last two decades. For example, the KORUS free trade agreement has displaced at least 60,000 American workers since its enactment in 2007.

Meanwhile, since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect in the 1990s, at least one million net U.S. jobs have been lost because of the free trade deal. About five million manufacturing jobs were lost across the country after NAFTA was signed.

One former steel town in West Virginia lost 94 percent of its steel jobs because of NAFTA, with nearly 10,000 workers in the town being displaced from the steel industry.

Vietnamese Boat People

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Image may contain: one or more people, outdoor and water
 Image may contain: 7 people, shoes

Here & Here

The Pseudoscience Attack on the South

 

The term “science” is applied rather loosely today. In some cases what we call science might be more appropriately labeled pseudoscience. The field of sociology comes to mind. It is more politically correct that scientifically objective, and you would be hard put to find a sociologist who doesn’t hold Leftist political views.

Sociological theories, questionable to begin with, are being further reinterpreted to justify Leftist socio/political agendas. In the early 1800s, sociology was created to analyze and improve societies.

But scholars have never agreed whether sociology is a science or simply an ideology. Its founders didn’t even agree on sociological interpretations.

Two of sociology’s founders, Herbert Spencer and Karl Marx, held diametricaly opposed views.

Radical Errors of the Public Mind

Image result for (Recollections of Alexander H. Stephens, His Diary, Myrta Lockett Avary

On the subject of naturalization of citizens, Congress derives its limited authority through Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution: “To establish [a] uniform rule of Naturalization . . .” and there was no intention to create a separate citizenry “of the United States.” The individual States determine who will become a citizen, and who is entitled to vote. Alexander H. Stephens expounds on this below.Bernhard Thuersam, www.Circa1865.com   The Great American Political Divide

Radical Errors of the Public Mind

“P.M. – The article on naturalization in the cyclopedia attracted my attention. It is strange what errors have crept into vogue and pass without scrutiny or question; especially on naturalization and its sequence, citizenship of the United States. The subject is treated as if Congress were empowered by the Constitution to confer upon aliens citizenship of the United States distinct from citizenship of particular States and Territories.

The truth is, Congress has no power to naturalize or to confer citizenship of the United States. Its only power is to establish a uniform rule to be pursued by the respective States and Territories on admitting aliens to their own citizenship.

Before the Constitution was adopted, each State possessed the right as an Independent Sovereign Power to admit to citizenship whom she pleased, and on such terms as she pleased.

All that the States did on this point in accepting the Constitution, was to delegate to Congress the power to establish a uniform rule so that an alien might not be permitted to become a citizen of one State on different terms from what might be required in another; especially, as in one part of the Constitution it is stipulated that the citizens of each shall be entitled in all the rest to the rights and privileges of their citizens.

But no clause of the Constitution provides for or contemplates citizenship of the United States as distinct from citizenship of some particular State or Territory. When any person is a citizen of any one of the States united, he thereby, and thereby only, becomes and can be considered a citizen of the United States.

Errors in the public mind on this question are radical and fundamental, and have the same source as many others equally striking.”

(Recollections of Alexander H. Stephens, His Diary, Myrta Lockett Avary, LSU Press, 1998 (original 1910), excerpts pp. 312-313)

Emily 141 Tran Quy Cap, Saigon 1971

 141 Tran Quy Cap, Saigon


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Pecker Dunne - Wexford

Via comment by bogsidebunny on Who's Going to Fill Their Shoes?
"It's no consolation for the current situation in our state, Brock but the same thing is happening in Ireland. I lived there for several years back in the day and met this singer before he passed away. Major motorways have decimated the rural communities there."




Student newspaper editorial: White feminists 'should call themselves sexist, racist, and homophobic'

Via Billy

A Louisiana State University student editorial tells white women that their brand of feminism is

A new opinion piece in the Louisiana State University student newspaper tells white women that their brand of feminism is “not inclusive.”

“White feminists should not call themselves feminists, but instead should call themselves sexist, racist and homophobic,” student Ashlon Lusk writes in the Daily Reveille.

“If you do not support bisexual Muslim women, you are not a feminist. If you do not support non-binary Latino men, you are not a feminist,” Lusk explains. “If you do not support women who get abortions, you are not a feminist. If you do not support immigrants, you are not a feminist.”

Part 4 of a Series on Reconstruction: Economic and Political Tyranny

Via Mike

 Part 4 of a Series on Reconstruction: Economic and Political Tyranny

The high tariff policies that touched off Southern Secession in 1860-61 were instituted and kept in place until 1913. As feared, these high tariffs increased the costs of living and business in the South.

This put its chief export, cotton, at a competitive disadvantage with Brazilian, Indian, and Egyptian cotton. Ninety-five percent of U.S. tax revenues came from tariffs, of which over 80 percent was collected in the South, and over 75 percent was used to enrich and subsidize Northern industry and build Northern infrastructure.

One asset the South had left after the war despite all the destruction was five million bales of cotton.

More @ The Tribune

The beautiful GM Futurliner – only nine survive & one sold for $4 million

Via David

Front right of Futurliner #3 on display in Salt Lake City, UT Photo Credit

There were only 12 Futurliners built between 1939 and 1940, and of those 12 only nine have been found. Two of the finds are beyond restoration but will live on as parts for other restorations. The GM Futurliners are custom built vehicles that were styled by Harley Earl in the 1940s; they were also a very important part of the Parade of Progress.

Purging Graveyards for Progress

 


Yes, give me a land with a grave in each spot
And names in the graves that shall not be forgot;
Yes, give me the land of the wreck and the tomb–
There is grandeur in graves–there is glory in gloom[1]

The new Kulturekampf, having already eyed and attacked the more visible elements of Dixie identity in prominent places across the South, feels its appetite growing. The long talons, sharpened on their success in removing public praise for the leaders of the South, now clawingly reach further and further into the quiet places of Southern repose. They rail and wail and attempt to rend any fond remaining sentiment to pieces. Take, for instance, the recent debacle which has disturbed Forest Hill Cemetery of Madison, Wisconsin.

During the War, Southern prisoners were held in nearby Camp Randall before being deposited into that Chicagoan horror, Camp Douglas. While at Camp Randall, some of the men succumbed to illness and injury, ultimately ending their whittled and weakened days in that sad spot in Wisconsin. These one hundred forty Southerners never returned home. Their graves grace a small, green field upon which they had never warred, but only died.

In addition to the bodies of the fallen, the graveyard contained, until recently, two small memorials lauding their sacrifices. One has been removed and likely will not return as, it was said, it offered “no historical value.”[2] The other, according to the options on the table, will be altered, removed, or joined by another display to negate the monument’s message.

A message is inadvertently being made just by these moribund maneuvers. It proclaims clearly to every Southerner: your dead are not worthy to be praised. They should, if a person has decency, be derided and hated. The names of the interred should only serve as emblems of infamy
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The laughable accusations leveled against the poor men who fell so far from home are as inane as they are insane. Prime among them is the idea that they were somehow traitors. A union of states such as the present was built upon the idea of casting off oppressors. If treason, so called, is the litmus test of removal from remembrance, then the Founders must likewise fall. For they, after all, dared raise their hands against the authority of King George and Parliament, both of which had a stronger case for legitimacy than that of the Lincoln administration in 1861. But the word treason merely masks an attempt to destroy an alternate culture in opposition to the all-consuming maw that is the present-day United States. The oft-sounded tirades against our forefathers are but bludgeons to serve this end.

This sad event, which disturbs not only the sleeping soldiers in their graves, but also the minds of decent people everywhere, serves to show the end these people desire. Confederate statues along the streets of once-proud cities are toppled in the name of progress, because, it was stated, their place in the public eye was too prominent for the men’s worth. Now we see the natural extension of the same hatred, for an appetite once fed becomes insatiable. The quiet of a graveyard is thus disturbed because, lest someone stumble inadvertently upon some marker lauding Southern valour, they succumb to the message therein. The shady silence that is proper to tomb-plots will, for a time, ring with Northern machinery affecting the removal of a this reminder of Southern spirit.

The great Poet-priest of the South, Father Abram J. Ryan, once remarked that “only the dead are the free.”[3] It is a damning day when one must even question that.

Who's Going to Fill Their Shoes?

 



When I was very young, I recall my father telling me of George “No-Show” Jones, a country music legend. The moniker, I was told, was given after Jones failed to play a concert in some town in Texas. He was said to be seen riding a motorcycle in the opposite direction of his “postponed” performance, with a very attractive blonde clinging to his back.

The interest in Jones grew over the years, especially after it was discovered that Jones’ voice lent itself to study-periods, where other types of music would become too much of a distraction. But distracted I did indeed become, despite intent, by one of Jones’ songs and the accompanying music video: “Who’s Gonna Fill Their Shoes.” While the question of the song is directed at Jones’ Southern music counterparts like Elvis Presley or Hank Williams, it may be applied to others as well. As the video begins, Jones’ touring bus pulls into a small filling station along some country highway. The station attendant remarks that, since the interstate was put in, they hadn’t had so many visitors. Jones comes out to sign the old man’s guitar and the old man takes him inside to see memorabilia of Conway Twitty, Jerry Lee Lewis, Lefty Frizzell, and other Southern performers. The old man asks Jones to play something, resulting in the title song.

But while those great performers of the past have all passed on, and none near their heights or take their place, we may pose the question as one in reference to the old man: who’s going to fill his shoes?

The trend of the past century has been one of ready and rapid urbanisation and suburbanisation – an emptying of the rural populations. Declining birthrates and regional migration contribute to this. Dependence upon manufacturing , which fills an area with success and just as easily deflates this newfound affluency with departure, causes small mill-towns to court more business or lose their citizens who have been deprived of work. The economics of raising many children in such an environment, while not impossible, is seen by many as too much of a hardship, and the people seek out where monetary success and a good dollar living may be had.

The old man in the filling station is the one we are left pondering – for it is he who is rapidly disappearing from the landscape of the South. Communities are crippled where there is no consistency, with the exception being the consistency of a steady decline. Where will the families be that tend the farms or work the old country filling stations? Who will provide the populations that will carry on the small town traditions across the South? These are difficult questions to answer with no salient solution. My own hometown is losing its population at a steady pace. My father, rather than uproot the family and move us to some city, chose to commute instead. Thankfully, his work allowed this for years, and then, at last, he was able to secure work at home. These were difficult situations in which he bore the burden of extra travel on his own person in attempts to profit his family. I believe he succeeded in gifting us with something wonderful and irreplaceable – a true home.

One is left wondering whom he will imitate – Jones, who sought ease away from burden with a broad on his back, or a father who goes forward, so that his family may stay behind?

Andrew P. Napolitano: In Defense of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms

Via Billy

 Image result for In Defense of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms  By Andrew P. Napolitano

The Ash Wednesday massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, seems to have broken more hearts than similar tragedies that preceded it. It was no more senseless than other American school shootings, but there is something about the innocence and bravery and eloquence of the youthful survivors that has touched the souls of Americans deeply.

After burying their dead, the survivors have mobilized into a mighty political force that loosely seeks more laws to regulate the right to keep and bear arms. The young people, traumatized and terrified with memories of unspeakable horror that will not fade, somehow think that a person bent on murder will obey gun laws.

More @ LRC

Unemployment benefits claims drop to lowest level in 49 years

 Unemployment benefits claims drop to lowest level in 49 years

Americans applying for unemployment benefits plummeted to their lowest level in more than 49 years last week.

First-time jobless claims fell to a seasonally adjusted 210,000 in the week ending Feb. 24, a drop of 10,000, which is the lowest level since Dec. 6, 1969 when it was 202,000, the Labor Department reported on Thursday.

The four-week average, which is less volatile than the weekly figure dipped to 220,500, a decrease of 5,000, the lowest level since Dec. 27, 1969 when it was 219,750.

The economy added 200,000 jobs in January and the unemployment rate held at 4.1 percent, the lowest level in 17 years.

More @ The Hill

The Self Defense Stories You Don’t See in the Mainstream News

 Women Shooter Self Defense Gun


Self Defense Gun Stories Podcast to look at three new examples. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they trained and prepared?   What can we learn from their experience? Listen and find out. (17-minute podcast)
All three victims survived lethal attacks because they had a gun.

First Story- Do you have a gun nearby at night?

 More @ Ammoland

The Kabuki Theater with Jeff Sessions continues, only now Trump is directly including the IG in it.

Via Iver

 Profile picture

Donald J. TrumpVerified account @realDonaldTrump
Why is A.G. Jeff Sessions asking the Inspector General to investigate potentially massive FISA abuse. Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey etc. Isn’t the I.G. an Obama guy? Why not use Justice Department lawyers? DISGRACEFUL!

Listen carefully: the SAME DOJ/FBI PEOPLE involved in covering up the Hillary Clinton classified info/email scandal are the SAME DOJ/FBI PEOPLE involved in the FISA Court/Steele Dossier shenanigans and are the SAME DOJ/FBI PEOPLE involved in the Flynn case.
 
Trump is REINFORCING the DNC Media narrative that Horowitz's investigation until now has been VERY NARROWLY LIMITED *only* into looking at the Hillary email case.

He has a reason for doing this.

Tucker: YouTube's 'Trusted' Content 'Flaggers' Include 'Wholly Discredited Hate Group' - $PLC

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Video @ Fox

Nostalgia Electrics Retro Series 3-In-1 Breakfast Station