Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Classic: Reply to Should this new Southern flag replace the Confederate battle flag?

Via comment by Bob on Should this new Southern flag replace the Confeder... " I posted the Gateway Pundit story on my Facebook page, a FB friend replied with this:"


What Happened to the Warrior’s Ethic?

Via comment by Anonymous on Confederate flag prompts school lockdown: Student 

David Yeagley

A good man who posted many Confederate pieces.  He left us way too soon and may you rest in peace, brave warrior.

Yankees respected Confederates. Why must we despise them today?
Back in 2006, my wife and I went to a friend’s house to watch Oscar De La Hoya fight Ricardo Mayorga for the World Boxing Council light–middleweight boxing championship. My wife was unfamiliar with professional boxing and was taken aback by the trash talking between the two foes, which HBO recapped during the intro to the show. “You’re going to be my bitch in my bed anytime I want you,” was one of Mr. Mayorga’s more printable insults.

Mr. De La Hoya won handily with a 6th round TKO, to the delight of many fans and my wife as well.

But, to her surprise, the fighters embraced after the fight and appeared to let bygones be bygones.
“You are a great fighter, a great champion,” Mr. Mayorga said. “I apologize for everything I said to you.”

How, she wondered, could everything be so easily settled?

The fact is, settling grievances through combat is pretty common. Kids at schools everywhere still “take it outside” and are often friends afterwards. Fighters in the boxing ring, the UFC, and other combat sports routinely find their grievances settled after a fight.

This is sometimes referred to as “the warrior’s ethic.” If a problem can’t be talked out, it can be settled by combat, often followed by mutual respect between winner and the loser.

David Yeagley, who spoke several times at American Renaissance conferences, was a Comanche activist who understood the warrior ethic:

Confederate cannons raised from Pee Dee River

Via Cousin John

Onlookers take photos with their cell phones as a team of underwater archeologists, from the University of South Carolina, raise one of three Civil War cannons from the Great Pee Dee River near Florence, SC, Tuesday, September 29, 2015. Each cannon weighed upwards of 15,000 pounds.

For 20 years, amateur diver Bob Butler searched the murky waters of the Pee Dee River for cannons he knew had been jettisoned from a Confederate warship shortly before it was scuttled in advance of surging Union troops at the end of the Civil War.

He found one in 1995 as he dove near U.S. 301 on the Florence-Marion county line. He discovered another in 2006. He was on hand seven years later as a member of the Pee Dee Research and Recovery Team when the third cannon was located.

On Tuesday, Butler watched with quiet satisfaction as a team from the University of South Carolina raised the cannons from the muddy bottom of the river, some of the final remnants of Union Gen. William Sherman’s march through the Carolinas in 1865.

"We brought a little bit of South Carolina history to the surface today," Butler said. "This closed the book on a lot of history. It's really special."

More @ The State

Off to the 8th NC PATCON September 30 - October 5th 2015



8th NC PATCON September 30 - October 5th 2015

Should this new Southern flag replace the Confederate battle flag?

Via Billy

 Image result for Should this new Southern flag replace the Confederate battle flag?

Should be in MAD Magazine.

Southern pride.

In the heated debate surrounding the Confederate Flag, the defense offered by many has been that the symbol isn't representative of a culture built on slavery and racism but is, instead, a banner representing that Southerners are simply proud of their home, their people and their culture.

"What other symbol immediately lets the world know you are from the South?" they argue.

To tackle the problem, Studio 360, a national public radio program, commissioned a Texas-based design firm to design a new flag to represent the modern South. With a diverse team of designers with ties to both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, 70kft embraced the challenge with an understanding of the importance of their task. (You imbeciles actually paid cash for this?)

More @ AL

Arson attack at Bethlehem’s St Charbel Monastery, probably the work of Islamic fundamentalists

Via Billy

Sobhy Makhoul, the chancellor of the Maronite Patriarchate in Jerusalem, told AsiaNews that the fire that broke out over the weekend at St Charbel Maronite Monastery (pictured) in Bethlehem was deliberately set. “It was an act of arson, not a fire caused by an electrical problem, an act of sectarian vandalism by radical Muslims.”

The fire caused no casualties or injuries because the building is currently unoccupied and under renovation, but the damage is evident and the local Christian community is now fearful of further violence.

The arsonists “got inside a room that had a lot of stuff, including furniture,” said Sobhy Makhoul, because the building is undergoing restoration work. "The fire reached it and spread quickly throughout the structure."

Police sources said that Muslim extremist groups have been active in the area and the culprits are already knows and should “be soon apprehended.”

More @ Asia News

I am Swedish, but I live in "Absurdistan"

Via Mike


MSH gen3 loading techniques

Via grossfater_m

Restaurant Refuses Service To Soldier For Carrying Firearm

Via John

Over the weekend, a soldier with the National Guard was told to leave his gun outside of the Nicholasville Waffle House or he wouldn’t be served. The situation is now getting national attention.

Billy Welch said that he stopped at the Waffle House Sunday morning for breakfast. He was in his Army National Guard uniform and had his gun holstered to his side. After ordering his food, Welch said that a waitress signaled for him to come over. 

"I got up and I walked over to them, asked them how they were doing and stuff, and they said I'd have to take my firearm outside,” said Welch. "I don't feel comfortable taking my firearm away from me. I always keep it with me and they said, ‘it's one of our policies.’"

More @ Lex18