Saturday, October 9, 2021

The Appalachian Mountains

 Via True Appalachia hills people and places/Gregory A. Ostrander/Arthur Bass

May be an image of text that says 'Greenland Caledonian Mountains British Isles Scandinav Europe North America Appalachian Mountains Africa 2009 Tasa Graphic Arts,' 

The Scottish Highlands and the Appalachians are the same mountain range, once connected as the Central Pangean Mountains. Remnants of this massive mountain range include the Appalachian Mountains of North America, the Little Atlas of Morocco, Africa, Ireland, much of the Scottish Highlands and part of Scandinavia.These are the oldest mountains in the world. (Reminds me of the PI and Vietnam.  Looking at a world map you can plainly see how they were joined together eons ago. They also share some of the same food and their facial characteristics are similar.)

8 comments:

  1. Caledonian Mountains in Norway? Shouldn't that be Scotland?

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    1. Thanks and found this: The Caledonian Mountains are a European mountain range. They run from the Arctic Circle through Scandinavia and Scotland to northwest Ireland. The mountains include the North West Highlands, the Grampian mountains of Scotland and the Jotunheimen of Norway.
      https://www.dkfindout.com/uk/earth/mountains/caledonian-mountains/

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  2. Looking at it this way, it appears as a zipper pulled down... which it follows a fault line.

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  3. The map is looking at current sea levels. Better would be to look at the continental shelfs. Yes, the Appalachians are a very old mountain range. Being in NC you would be familiar with the red clay. The 'red wedge' flows off the Appalachians. One would expect to find the same red beds in the other regions.

    The U.S. eastern seaboard is a trailing or 'sunken' coast. (for comparison, look at the U.S. west coast - jagged, young) Is the same said of those coasts in Europe? Further, are the coasts in Europe which are postulated to have once been joined to the Appalachians the same distance from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which is a spreading center? Why or why not? That question must be answered before oh so conveniently comparing current day sea coasts and say they fit.

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    1. That would be fine but the lands fit like a puzzle to me.

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    2. Saw the red clay which you mentioned in Newfoundland. Matter of fact the tour guide mentioned it and pointed out that the same red clay was found on the mainland on the US eastern seabord.

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    3. Amazing that this is all new information to me. Thanks.

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