Thursday, December 15, 2011

Flag of the Training Air Wing, Finnish Air Force

Interesting. Can't find anymore information about the flag.

Lentosotakoulu.svg

8 comments:

  1. Brock: Google photos of the "Finnish Brewster Buffalo." The Buffalo was one of the early American monoplanes used mainly for export sale because it pretty much sucked, but the Finns put it to good use against their enemies early in WW2. Anyhoo...The swastika insignia on the plane was the Finns logo early on I assume, and had nothing to do with Nazi Germany I'm pretty sure. I ain't no expert on this stuff, but I AM a WW2 history nerd...

    http://www.warbirdforum.com/herdbuffs.jpg

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  2. The swastika insignia on the plane was the Finns logo early on I assume, and had nothing to do with Nazi Germany I'm pretty sure

    Makes sense and needless to say it is also a 2,000 year old emblem of Buddhism. Good shot of the airplanes.

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  3. The Finnish use of the Swastika pre-dates the Nazi regime. http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=6577

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  4. The swastika has been used since biblical times. Hitler just perverted it.

    http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007453

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  5. http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=6577

    Thanks.

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  6. Brock, Et Alia:

    The swastika, otherwise known as the "wheel of life", also was a sacred symbol used by the American Indians, and because of that, used to be featured on Arizona state highway signs.

    It was seen decorating a motel out West, where the motel units were shaped like teepees.

    Plus, the Boy Scouts of America used it because they admire and emulate the American Indians.

    Thank you.

    John Robert Mallernee
    Armed Forces Retirement Home
    Gulfport, Mississippi 39507

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  7. I now remember about the Indian connection, but didn't know about the Boy Scouts one.

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  8. It's been used by Europeans for thousands of years. Nothing wrong with the swastika.

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