Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Dominique Venner: The Reasons for a Voluntary Death

Via Matthew

 Carl

Then out spake brave Horatius,
The Captain of the Gate:
To every man upon this earth
Death cometh soon or late.
And how can man die better
Than facing fearful odds,
For the ashes of his fathers,
And the temples of his gods

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Translated by Greg Johnson

Translations: Italian, Portuguese, Spanish

I am healthy in body and mind, and I am filled with love for my wife and children. I love life and expect nothing beyond, if not the perpetuation of my race and my mind. However, in the evening of my life, facing immense dangers to my French and European homeland, I feel the duty to act as long as I still have strength. I believe it necessary to sacrifice myself to break the lethargy that plagues us.

I give up what life remains to me in order to protest and to found. I chose a highly symbolic place, the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris, which I respect and admire: she was built by the genius of my ancestors on the site of cults still more ancient, recalling our immemorial origins.

While many men are slaves of their lives, my gesture embodies an ethic of will. I give myself over to death to awaken slumbering consciences. I rebel against fate. I protest against poisons of the soul and the desires of invasive individuals to destroy the anchors of our identity, including the family, the intimate basis of our multi-millennial civilization. While I defend the identity of all peoples in their homes, I also rebel against the crime of the replacement of our people.

The dominant discourse cannot leave behind its toxic ambiguities, and Europeans must bear the consequences. Lacking an identitarian religion to moor us, we share a common memory going back to Homer, a repository of all the values ​​on which our future rebirth will be founded once we break with the metaphysics of the unlimited, the baleful source of all modern excesses.

I apologize in advance to anyone who will suffer due to my death, first and foremost to my wife, my children, and my grandchildren, as well as my friends and followers. But once the pain and shock fade, I do not doubt that they will understand the meaning of my gesture and transcend their sorrow with pride. I hope that they shall endure together. They will find in my recent writings intimations and explanations of my actions.

Note 

For more information, one can go to my publisher, Pierre-Guillaume Roux. He was not informed of my decision, but he has known me a long time.

Source

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13 comments:

  1. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.

    I have now posted it on my own web site, "OUR ETERNAL STRUGGLE", giving you due credit.

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  2. So very, very sad. He thought his death would bring change. It won't. His voice is silent now and soon his countrymen, what is left of them, will forget. The identity of all nations is gone.
    And so few see it.

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  3. Accomplished nothing except unto himself. Suicide for death's sake is an empty gesture done solely to fulfill the ego.

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    Replies
    1. As I commented elsewhere:
      If I chose to lay down my life, it would only be in my belief that I would accomplish something by it, whether a dead tyrant or something that would spurn others on and I'm afraid the latter would not accomplish one iota with the brain-set of the average American today

      Delete
  4. I can hear the music to the M.A.S.H. show in my head. "Suicide is painless..." Not the way I would choose to go but it does make an impact. I would like to read some of this fascinating man's books.

    From Wikipedia:
    "Venner was a specialist regarding weaponry and hunting and wrote several books on these subjects. His principal historical works were: Baltikum (1974), Le Blanc Soleil des vaincus (The White Sun of the Vanquished) (1975), Le Cœur rebelle (The Rebel Heart) (1994), Gettysburg (1995), Les Blancs et les Rouges (The Whites and the Reds)(1997), Histoire de la Collaboration (History of the Collaboration) (2000) and Histoire du terrorisme (History of Terrorism) (2002). His Histoire de l'Armée rouge (History of the Red Army) won the prestigious Prix Broquette-Gonin d'histoire awarded by the Académie française (the French Academy) in 1981."

    Only yesterday I resolved to dust off my French. I must have heard Venner's gun fire.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gettysburg (1995), Les Blancs et les Rouges (The Whites and the Reds)(1997)

      They jumped out at me and my expertise in the French language is relegated to such as Steak tartare, Chateaubriand, Cognac, etcetera.:)

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    2. Chateauneuf du Pape at Georgetown restaurants. The mind reels.

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    3. All mine were in Vietnam. I;m sure you know that the French were there for 100 years and left some excellent restaurants.

      La Castille, Chickens & Booze
      http://www.namsouth.com/viewtopic.php?t=31&highlight=french

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  5. France’s Le Pen hails far-right Notre Dame suicide
    http://www.dw.de/frances-le-pen-hails-far-right-notre-dame-suicide/a-16827986

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  6. With this suicide, I see a dichotomy in todays World. Where Whites, Christians and the beliefs in basic humanitarian appreciation, are being minimized and led to desperate acts while Statist, Islamic, and base Animal actions are becoming more acceptable and apparently welcomed.

    I have never been exposed to this Mr. Venner, and perhaps, this is a slight positive outcome from his (IMO) dreadful mistake. Thus, I will search his writings out and perhaps fwd them to others...But his voice, as noted above, his forever silenced, and any other wisdom and knowledge is lost for all time. Great men are hardly acknowledged in their present, but are heralded in the future.
    Salut


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. his voice, as noted above, his forever silenced, and any other wisdom and knowledge is lost for all time. Great men are hardly acknowledged in their present, but are heralded in the future.

      Amen and hope all is well.

      Delete