Thursday, August 10, 2017

Man Snaps Photo Of Manhattan Skyline In 1956, With Crosses On Building For Easter

Via Billy


Conservative Tribune has a great story with just one picture that shows the big difference between 1956 and today, in terms of reaction to public displays of Christianity.

From Conservative Tribune: 

These days, public displays of Christian faith are frowned upon. Heck, any Christian who makes a big deal about using “Merry Christmas” as opposed to “Happy Holidays” is subject to tut-tutting by the media.

It wasn’t always this way, though — and a photo from New York City in Easter of 1956 proves it.

10 comments:

  1. That's sooo cool. The way we were.

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  2. Back when American had common sense.

    Can you imagine that happening today?

    And why not!

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    Replies
    1. Back when American had common sense.

      Precisely.

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  3. Before the immigration laws of 1965. When we were a REAL country.
    -Stealth Spaniel

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    Replies
    1. & now just a distant memory which will not be brought back, unfortunately.

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  4. During Easter of 1956, I was ten years old and in the Fifth Grade at Spring Lake School (now called Lillian Black School, in honor of my Fourth Grade teacher) in Spring Lake, Cumberland County, North Carolina.

    School always began with recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance and the Lord's Prayer.

    My Seventh Grade teacher, Mrs. Horne, was the wife of a Baptist minister, and in her class, we openly discussed the Bible and Jesus Christ.

    One day, she asks us who our heroes were.

    Kids named off Robert E. Lee, George Washington, Stonewall Jackson, and so forth.

    That previous weekend, I'd just been to the Starlight Drive-in Theater with my family to see, "THE TEN COMMANDMENTS", so I said, "Moses".

    Mrs. Horne expressed her disappointment that no one in the class had named Jesus Christ as their hero.

    Oh, yes, and another thing that made our school and our community safer, more courteous, and more civilized was that we were racially segregated.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for your story and unfortunately the ending is all too true.

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  5. Great picture. Today that'd be declared "unAmerican".

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