Monday, October 1, 2012

Marching with our colours in Belfast

 


Protestants in Northern Ireland (Ulster) celebrated the one hundredth year anniversary of the Ulster Covenant this weekend with parades in Belfast and a festival at Stormont (the capital). A large portion of Ulster’s population is Ulster-Scots, people descended from Scottish settlers. In North America the Ulster-Scots are often called Scots-Irish. They are most heavily concentrated in Appalachia and the Upper South but have also spread out and across much of the rest of the South as well as other areas of the United States.

In the picture below, some Orangemen march with the Confederate flag of Dixie. The Bonnie Blue flag can also be seen to the left.

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Re-post below from FNC 2011

"Flying the colours in Northern Ireland

Proud sons of Ulster took to the streets of Newtownstewart in County Tyrone on 6 May, 2011 to show the colours and their loyalty to their country. For this son of Dixie it was especially stirring to see that they marched with the Confederate and Bonnie Blue flags, symbolizing the cultural and ethnic ties between the Ulster-Scots (“Scots-Irish”) and the people of Dixie."






 Confederate Army mural in Northern Ireland

Sons of Ulster who led the Confederate Army during the War of Northern Aggression.
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9 comments:

  1. I doubt very much that Loyalists in the north of Ireland fly the Confederate flag as if in some joined affilation with the Confederacy in the American Civil War. They use a whole range of flags, including the Israeli flag as a form of dominance and intimidation over Catholics especially every summer.( Ironic when considering that a large number of Irish Catholics fought for the Confederate Army). The Confederate flag along with the British union jack are hung from light posts simply as a form of marking terrority and hang there until they turn to rags.

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    Replies
    1. are hung from light posts

      Seems to be front and center in the parade.

      Delete
  2. So thats it then? What about the rest of my comment. If people from Georgia or Tennesse saw the Confederate flag as a rag in Loyalists areas of Belfast they would be ashamed. Even the British army has asked Loyalists to stop disrepecting their flags.

    http://www.politics.ie/forum/northern-ireland/211637-mod-accuses-loyalists-disrespecting-british-armys-flag.html

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    1. saw the Confederate flag as a rag

      Pictures, please.

      Delete
  3. Pictures please

    did you read the article?

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    Replies
    1. If you noticed, this piece is from 2011 and all I have asked for, is proof of the Confederate flag being displayed as a rag. That should be simple to accomplish if what you state is correct.

      Delete
  4. Heres another

    http://www.irishcentral.com/story/news/people_and_politics/loyalists-ask-us-to-respect-their-flag-as-they-burn-everyone-elses-215221501.html

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  5. This comment is not to Mr Townsend but any American readers of this blog.

    As an Irishman living in the U.S. with the utmost respect for the Union and Confederate flags and all who fought in the American civil war.
    Loyalists in the north of Ireland are not a group of people you want the Confederate flag to be associated with. With no authorisation or right, they have decided to use it as a form of intimadation and fear against others mainly Catholics who live in Belfast. Flags of other nations are burned on massive bonfires every July. The Confederate flag along with the British Union jack is flown from lamposts for months on end until they become rags and have to be removed at tax payers expense. The Confederate flag is often hoisted on lamposts along with Loyalists paramilitary flags. The Confederate army generals, six of whom were born in Ireland would be ashamed of the disrespect the flag has been shown by loyalists in Belfast.

    ReplyDelete