Saturday, June 15, 2013

US High School Recites Pledge In Arabic: “One Nation Under Allah”


 Rocky Mountain High School Principal Tony Lopez has been stunned by the level of vitriol directed at him and the students for the Arabic pledge

Well now, here is evidence of what I’ve been saying all along and that is that you cannot be religiously neutral. It just can’t happen. Religion is at our very core and if we will not honor the true and living God as God, then we will fill that vacuum with a false god. Exhibit A: Rocky Mountain High School in Colorado. Outrage is building over the fact that students were encouraged to recite the Pledge of Allegiance over the loudspeaker in Arabic replacing “one nation under God” with “one nation under Allah.”

The school’s principal, Tom Lopez, is standing by his decision to allow the pledge after receiving a flood of complaints from parents outraged over the incident. He claims to not be pushing and Islamic agenda.

Lopez told Fox News, “These students love this country. They were not being un-American in trying to do this. They believed they were accentuating the meaning of the words as spoken regularly in English.”


Danielle Clark, communications director of the Poudre School District, said “We understand not everybody would agree with the students’ choice. We’ve heard there are some who are upset.”

On the other hand, she said she received one email from a person who “thought it was a great thing.”
Catch that? In all of those that responded, Clark got one email that thought this was a “great thing!” Is this action backwards or what? Parents in Colorado, I’m warning you to get your children out of the public school system. This will continue to happen more and more.

14 comments:

  1. There is only one word in Arabic for "God", and that is.... "Allah". There's only one word in Spanish for "God", and it's "Dios". So... to say the "Pledge of Allegiance" in Arabic, for the FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASS, would necessitate the use of the word, in Arabic, for "God".... "Allah".
    It's not his "name", like "Jesus" or "Thor" or "Zeus", it's simply the word for "God", in that language.
    Why is everyone freaking out over this?
    The Pledge, said in Spanish, would have "Dios", not "God"...

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    1. Is this not correct?

      He claims that when one cites the pledge in Arabic that Allah is the word used for God, but that is not true. It is a proper name for their false deity, much like the God of the Bible’s is Yahweh. In other words, this is not a generic rendering of the word “God.” It is specific.

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    2. Here's a video of Palestinian Christians chanting "Allah, Souria, Bashar" in Jerusalem during Pascha (Easter). Translated as "only God, Syria and Bashar".

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiqZjWThBNc

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    3. If he gets taken out, the Christians are in deep, deep trouble.

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  2. Hey, I'm not trying to stir the pot on your page. I'm just trying to correct a false impression that many people have. The word for "God" in Arabic is "Allah", period. It's not his "name", like Zeus, or Apollo, or Odin, etc. It's their only word for "God", period. Allah is not the "name" of "their" deity, like "Zeus" is the "name" of a Greek god. It's the word their language uses to say "God." Like Spanish = "Dios", etc... "Dios" is not the "name" of a god, it's the Spanish word FOR God.

    It's the same word in ARAMAIC, the language of most of the Jews, and the language most of the Bible was written. And the Jews spoke it LOOOOOOOONG before "Islam" was ever created...
    It's easily available info; all you have to do is Google it. So, when an ancient Aramaic-speaking Jew spoke of "Allah", who was he referring to?

    "The corresponding Aramaic form is ʼĔlāhā ܐܠܗܐ in Biblical Aramaic and ʼAlâhâ ܐܲܠܵܗܵܐ in Syriac as used by the Assyrian Church, both meaning simply 'God'." The Hebrew term was "Elohim", the Latin "Deus", the German "Gott", Greek "Theos", etc.... They all mean only one thing: God.

    Elaha/Alaha/Allah; it's all the exact same word. Over the centuries, regional accents have changed the pronunciation, of course, exactly the same way thousands of other words have evolved...
    We would not be able to understand anything if transported to Shakespeare's England, for example, and certainly not any time before that. Because what we call "English" was not spoken then and there.

    "God" comes from Germanic language origins. "He" was never called "God" in the Bible, or the old days, etc. He would have been called Elohim by Hebrew speakers, "Allah" by Aramaic speakers (there was no Arabic language back then), "Deus" by Latin speakers, and in the parts of the Bible written in Greek, he is called.... "Theos".

    Come on, guys. Study some history. You might want to do a little research on the origin of the name "Yahweh", while you're at it. You just might be surprised...

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  3. Allah is NOT God's name or title. It is the name of a demonic deity that is the head of a satanic death cult called islam.

    The principal of that school should be tarred and feathered and run out of town on a rail.

    Diversification is not needed here.

    Bob
    III

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  4. I wonder often how long God will survive without my Southern Baptist Church to defend Him. I have counseled a couple of Christian ministers to help bail them out of trouble with their employing church and others. I have always told them that if they would clean up their acts that God would save them from the Church. And He has. It would work for America but I have long since despaired of us forsaking our sinful ways. Just look at us still arming al-Qaeda in Syria. We lead the world in corruption in the Big Three, Arms Sales, Energy Manipulation, and Finance. Our hubris knows no limits. I bear my share of guilt in one of them and try to make amends as I find a way.

    I don't defend God. I serve Him by the simple ways that Jesus taught. Share with the poor, give them food and water, visit them when sick, bind up their wounds, declare the Good News to them.

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  5. And I also contend that there is no profit in arguing about God, just conflict. I'll be quiet now.

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