Tuesday, September 16, 2014

1966 Chevrolet Nova SS 327/350 HP, 4-Speed



-Frame-off rotisserie restoration

- Factory correct Regal Red with bright Red interior

- Documented L79 Nova SS

- Original owners manual and factory shipping documents to original dealer in Shelby, NC

- M21 close-ratio 4-speed manual transmission

- 12 bolt 3.73 Positraction rear end

More @ MECUM

12 comments:

  1. I owned a 1967 Nova SS bright red with black interior. I paid the exorbitant sum of $300 in 1972. That was one fast fun car. I said the price was exorbitant because up to that point I had never paid over $75 for a Nova. In fact most I owned cost under $50. It was a whole different world then. I also owned a 1963 Chey II convertible. It came with a 194 straight six and three speed. That lasted until I got it home. I put in a 1965 Corvette 327 with 4-speed. Since it was a true SS it had 5 bolt rims and a 10 bolt rear end. I switched out the open pumpkin for a posi and w/411 gears. I wish I still had that one. I also had a 1965 Nova SS Nomad wagon but that is another story.

    Badger

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. & we wished we had kept them all. :) What's the wagon story? Oh, speaking of pumpkins, I had the core of one in the spare tire compartment in the back which was under the floor in front of the third seat which faced backwards in a Plymouth wagon I drove as a cab in San Clemente and on Camp Pendleton. One day I was returning from Oceanside on 5 and I got pulled over at the checkpoint by an agent who had a smirk on his face. When he told me to open the rear door, I realized what he thought and that was I had a wetback stuffed in there. :) His smirk and I went away.

      Delete
  2. That is the exact car I dreamed about owning when I turned 16 in 1966. Same color and all. I was a farm boy and had worked many long hard hours for no pay. In my community it was almost tradition for boys who worked hard on the farm to get a car when they turned 16. I don't know if my dad could have afforded it or not. I never found out as he got sick that year and died about 5 months after my birthday. At that point a car was the last thing on my mind. CH

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How sad for your dad to die so young. What happened?

      Delete
    2. Thanks but it was almost a half century ago now so some of the sting is gone. He actually died of massive aneurisms in the femoral arteries of both legs. The doctors never would admit it to me but I know it was the result of him being electrocuted 3 years earlier when he and his hired man were trying were trying to get the mud out of a 30 foot piece of 3" diameter aluminum irrigation pipe and accidentally stuck it in a 24,000 volt power line. I'm 100% positive it wouldn't have happened if I had been there because I would have noticed. My dad tended to put his head down, bow his neck and go at a problem without looking around. It killed the hired man on the spot.

      I wanted to stay and help them work that Monday morning. I was within a month of turning 13. Vacation bible school started that day. I didn't want to go. I wanted to help my dad and offered to do so. He thought I want to go to church and play and told me to go ahead on to Bible school. It was one of those deals where I was trying to give him something and he was trying to give me something. I've regretted it all these years but he told me to go and I didn't argue with him. Never did.

      When they stuck the pipe against the wire my dad was walking it up and the hired man was holding the other end down to the ground. Daddy had his elbows bent. The current arched off his elbows, missed his vital organs but went back into his body at his groin and went out through his feet where it blew holes as big as a 30 cal round in both feet where the steel rivets were in his Dr. Shoal's arch supports. He got over it after a few months and was ok until the year I turned 16 when he started having severe pain in his legs. The doctors thought he had blood clots. Or at least that the story they told me. I think the docs and my mom were all trying to protect me from feeling guilty. You have to remember that this was in 1966 and medicine then was a far cry from what it is now. After a stay in the hospital and some surgery they sent him home but he got sick a few days later and I drove him back to the hospital where he died. They really didn't know what was wrong until they did an autopsy (or claimed they didn't). All they really knew was his system was full of toxin and they thought his kidneys were failing. He needed to be on dialysis but in the fall of 1966 there was 1 (ONE) dialysis machine in the state of NC, at Duke. There was a 90 day or so waiting list to get on it and he only had hours.

      The doctors told us that even if they had known what the problem was they couldn't have fixed it without amputating both his legs at the hip. The technology just didn't exist back then to fix that kind of problem (artery splicing). That news seemed to comfort my mom and sister some as they knew he wouldn't want to live without his legs. I remember clearly what came to my mind and what I almost said out loud but managed to choke back. "I would have carried him anywhere he needed to go" On my back if necessary. I still would but he'd be 103 now so I guess it's past time to let it go. CH

      Delete
    3. Thanks and I remeber this now. " I'm 100% positive it wouldn't have happened if I had been there because I would have noticed."

      Yes, time to go, not that we want to do so.

      Delete
  3. Can you say Factory Sleeper?
    I can.
    I bet that little joker gets right with the program.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wouldn't call it a sleeper as with the 327 emblem that year, I believe it started at 300HP which would have still been fun.:) Now, if it was painted a different color and sported the six emblem, then he could make some money. My buddy had a '65 Sting Ray with the same 327/350 motor and it was quicker than the FI one, as I remember they were difficult to keep tuned perfectly.

      Delete
    2. That 327/350 was way ahead of it's time. It was one of if not the first US production engine to make more hp than it's cubic inches. It was a solid lifter, cammed up rig that probably wasn't all that streetable but I sure wanted one. I would have settled for the standard 327. I can remember telling my uncle about it and he as much as called me a liar when I told him it was a 327 with 350 HP. He told me that was impossible. I didn't argue with him. He had a pretty bad time in Europe in WWII and tended to be a bit grumpy so I just let it go but I never forgot it. obviously. CH

      Delete
    3. It was one of if not the first US production engine to make more hp than it's cubic inches. It was a solid lifter, cammed up

      Certainly was. I had the 289/271 HiPo in '65 because the 289 Cobra was , hold on now, over $7K and way too much! :) It had solids and a 3/4 race cam also. But the Shelby 289 put out 306 HP and I just checked today and it now puts out 450HP whch should move you right along. :) http://tinyurl.com/qx2v4sv The one minor problem I saw with this was the $25K price tag. :) The fastest thing I ever rode in was the 289 Cobra and there was only two tenths of a second difference 0 to 60 between that and the 427 because of weight.

      Delete