Thursday, September 4, 2014

Cops Knock on Man’s Door, Ask to See ID and ‘Check’ His House. The Way He Handles It Has Some Cheering, Others Criticizing.

 LANGUAGE


A man in Inglewood, California, is receiving both praise and criticism for the way he handled a recent exchange with a pair of police officers who knocked on his door while searching for a wanted felon accused of beating his girlfriend. Avel Amarel uploaded video of the interaction to Facebook on August 25 and it has since been shared more than 10,000 times.

In the video, Amarel answers the door with his cellphone camera recording. One of the officers immediately asks him to turn the camera off.

“No, I can’t,” Amarel responds.

“OK, I said turn it off,” the officer says.

Amarel refuses to comply with the officer’s order and things eventually calm down after the situation briefly turned chaotic.

More @ The Blaze

18 comments:

  1. Two things.
    1. Good for him for standing his ground.
    2. Good for them for not getting police defensive and enforcing their Authoritah.

    interesting that they don't want a camera in their face, but have no problem shining flashlights in his.

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    Replies
    1. interesting that they don't want a camera in their face, but have no problem shining flashlights in his.

      Picky, picky, picky........:)

      Delete
  2. That man is damn lucky not to be just another murdered civilian by criminal cops.

    Badger

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  3. Anyone else catch how often the story changed?

    The cops start off 'looking for a wanted felon'
    Then they go to 'parolee at large boyfriend'
    Then they go to "told you are friends with felon"

    They don't know what the felon looks like.

    So they have a report from an attacked person but they don't know the description -- despite the fact that they know his name, they know he is on parolee -- I'm thinking that probably mug shots are available.

    Then they charge him with possibly harboring a fugitive; which I believe is probable cause for the search if true. Yet they don't search. Another lie.

    Good for him for standing his ground in the face of the cops repeated lies. Getting more and more video like this out there will do two important things. Show the levels the cops will sink to and teach people their rights.

    Bob S.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The cops start off 'looking for a wanted felon'
      Then they go to 'parolee at large boyfriend'
      Then they go to "told you are friends with felon"

      Good point.

      ==================

      Show the levels the cops will sink to and teach people their rights.

      Yes.

      Delete
    2. Sociopaths can and do lie easily like that.
      No conscience. No moral dilemma. They are just following orders. They are the hammer and we are the nails that need pounding.

      Delete
    3. They are the hammer and we are the nails that need pounding.

      Evidently.

      Delete
  4. If he would have stepped out of his house, they'd have had him cuffed and stuffed faster than you say I-wanna-lawyer. Then they would have searched his home, anyway.

    Good on him. More Americans need to stand up for their rights, after all you don't have any rights if you don't stand up for them.

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    Replies
    1. If he would have stepped out of his house, they'd have had him cuffed and stuffed faster than you say I-wanna-lawyer.

      Agreed.

      Delete
  5. The cops want to search is home for a fugitive and at 1:30 in the video the cop says "we don't know what he looks like". Glad he stood his ground.

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  6. "we don't know what he looks like".

    Any live body will do........

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  7. Last thing you hear on the video: "ain't play'in no games f'ing wid this mother F'er.

    I love it. The cops know the law. they just know they can throw their weight around and get away with it. I spent a year on a grand jury. After a few months all of us started catching on and asking the cops pertinent questions. There were a few cops that constantly brought cases where they had intimidated folks in routine traffic stops into letting them search the vehicle where they allegedly found drugs or other illegal substances. We started asking the cops what would you have done if they had refused the search. They always replied, nothing we had on probably cause. But once the subject allows them to search or to enter in the case of a residence then anything they see or find can be construed into a crime. For example, do you reload ammo? Then you have a set of scales in your house. Do you have a box of sandwich bags in your kitchen? A set of scales and baggies adds up to possession of drug paraphernalia and they'll probably charge you with possession of paraphernalia and intent to traffic or sell.

    We actually had one cop come before us regarding a drug bust. He was not the arresting officer. He went to the residence in regards to a civil dispute over a parking space shared with a neighbor. The back up officer started digging around in a planter on the patio of the house and came out with a butt of a joint and arrested both subjects inside the house for possession of marijuana. The back up cop who made the arrest had since moved on to another agency. The cop that appeared before us told us that we should subpoena the arresting officer and ask him to explain his probable cause. We did one better and threw the indictment out.

    Had to edit this to add. One of the two challenge words required for posting my reply was "caseload". Appropriate I think.

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  8. BRAVO!!!

    Give the man a medal!

    Bob
    III

    ReplyDelete
  9. Only slightly off topic ;)

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-09-04/why-independence-so-frightening-some-people

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